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FESTIVALS Italy

Travelling festival offers politically charged fare

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The fifth edition of Libero cinema in libera terra (July 13-24) – the itinerant festival that brings political films to those areas removed from the clutches from organised crime in which legality has been restored – will kick off in the northern region of Piedmont, which is anything but impervious to mafia trafficking.

Promoted by the Cinemovel Foundation (whose honorary president is Ettore Scola) and the Libera. Associazioni, nomi e numeri contro le mafie, the committee – presided over by Don Luigi Ciotti – of over 1500 associations, groups and schools, and a "caravan" comprising volunteers, guests and directors will visit seven regions, to remind citizens that the Mafia is not an exclusively southern issue. After Piedmont, the festival will head to Lombardy, Sicily, Apulia, Calabria, Campania and Abruzzo. Each ideal locals, in their own way, for looking at problems and situations that are far from local.

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The films that will be presented by the filmmakers and representatives of the fight against crime include several recent titles, such as Michelangelo Frammartino’s The Four Times [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Michelangelo Frammartino
interview: Savina Neirotti
film profile
]
, Marco Risi’s biopic Fortapasc [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]
(on journalist Giancarlo Siani, killed by the Camorrah), the low-budget debut È tempo di cambiare (“It’s Time to Change”) by Fernando Muraca, as well as numerous documentaries.

Italian titles include Alberto Puliafito’s Comando e Controllo, which looks at life during a state of emergency, the aftermath of the earthquake in L’Aquila, as well as the work of the National Civil Protection Agency, not unlike Sabina Guzzanti’s Draquila [+see also:
trailer
Interview Sabina Guzzanti [IT]
film profile
]
(also in the programme); while Andrea D'Ambrosio’s Campania Burning brings to light the underbelly of illegal labour.

There are also a couple of noteworthy films by women on the Middle East: Simone Bitton’s Rachel [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, an investigation into the death of American pacifist Rachel Corrie, who was crushed by a bulldozer by the Israeli army; and Firouzeh Khosrovani’s Rough Cut, which through the “mutilated” mannequins of Teheran’s stores is a reflection on women’s conditions in Iran.

(Translated from Italian)

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