email print share on Facebook share on Twitter share on reddit pin on Pinterest

AWARDS Poland

Skolimowski’s Essential Killing triumphs at Eagles

by 

Skolimowski’s Essential Killing triumphs at Eagles

Winner of Best Film and Best Director, as well as Best Score (Pawel Mykietyn) and Best Editing (Reka Lemhenyi and Maciej Pawlinski), Jerzy Skolimowski’s Essential Killing [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Jerzy Skolimowski
film profile
]
dominated the prize list at the 13th Eagle Awards, Polish cinema’s most prestigious accolades. Having already scooped double honours at last year’s Venice Mostra (Special Jury Prize and best Actor, see review), Essential Killing shows that Skolimowski has returned to the forefront after ending 17 years of inactivity with his previous film Four Nights With Anna [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(2008).

(The article continues below - Commercial information)

The Polish Film Academy also awarded four technical prizes to Jan Jakub Kolski’s Venice [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(see news), which took Best Cinematography (Artur Reinhart), Best Production Design (Joanna Macha), Best Costume Design (Malgorzata Zacharska) and Best Sound (Jacek Hamela).

Meanwhile, Jacek Borcuch’s All That I Love [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(see video interview and news) swept up three awards: Best Screenplay (penned by the director), Discovery of the Year (for actor Mateusz Kosciukiewicz) and the Audience Award.

The Eagle for Best Actress went to Urszula Grabowska for her performance in Feliks Falk’s Joanna [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(see news) and Best Actor to Robert Wieckiewicz for Jan Kidawa-Blonski’s Little Rose [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(news).

Best European Film Award went, unsurprisingly, to Roman Polanski’s Ghost Writer [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
. Finally, a Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Tadeusz Chmielewski (born in 1927), who directed cult comedies including Ewa Wants to Sleep (1957), How I Unleashed World War II (1969) and I Hate Monday (1971).

(Translated from French)

Did you enjoy reading this article? Please subscribe to our newsletter to receive more stories like this directly in your inbox.