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SAN SEBASTIAN 2013

Confronting old-age with the Nouvelle Vague

by 

- Roger Michell, director of films such as Notting Hill and Enduring Love, will be competing with Le Week-end for the Golden Shell at the 60th San Sebastian Film Festival

Confronting old-age with the Nouvelle Vague

Le Week-end [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, directed by Roger Michell (behind other successes such as Notting Hill and Vénus [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, for which Peter O' Toole was nominated for an Oscar), is in the running for the Golden Shell in San Sebastian.

Directed with accuracy and effectiveness, Le Week-end’s strongest asset is without a doubt its screenplay, by well-known British director and writer Hanif Kureishi (London Kills Me), which picks up on some of the most important themes of his creative universe, applying them to his vital and innovative work. 

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Nick (an excellent Jim Broadbent) and Meg (exquisitely played by a captivating Lindsay Duncan) are a couple of British teachers at the end of their careers. Years after their honeymoon there, they return to Paris to try and reignite their marriage, which is in crisis after years spent together. Meg thinks she deserves a better life and starts distancing herself from her husband, from whom old relationship problems, including doubts, grudges, and fears emerge. She finds herself insecure and defenceless without Nick though, as he lgoes through his own internal analysis and reflection process, questioning what his life has been like, as a teacher and a husband.

Le Week-end starts off being another film entirely: aimed at an older public, an increasingly important demographic as was shown by the success of the Marigold Hotel [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
. In a sudden turn of events though, the film ends up paying homage to the French Nouvelle Vague, with nods to Godard and his film Bande á part, giving life to a beautiful, ironic and fascinating film, reminiscent of the free spirit of the 1960s, the decade of their youth. After watching the film, many critics talked of Richard Linklater’s famous trilogy as a potential source of inspiration for the film.  

The film was produced by Kevin Loader for FILM4, while British Embankment Films (London) is taking care of international sales.

(Translated from Spanish)

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