email print share on Facebook share on Twitter share on reddit pin on Pinterest

RELEASES Italy

Italian films span comedy, period and animation genres

by 

Come tu mi vuoi [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(“As You Want Me”) heads the five new European titles this weekend. The feature debut by Volfango De Biasi, distributed by Medusa Film (which also produced the film, with Ideacinema), opening on over 360 screens, is counting on the drawing power of leads Nicolas Vaporidis and Cristiana Capotondi, together again after Fausto Brizzi’s Night Before Exams [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, the 2006 title that grossed more than other debut film in Italian history.

(The article continues below - Commercial information)

Capotondi also appears in Roberto Faenza’s The Viceroys [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, which 01 Distribution is releasing on 202 screens. Featuring television star Alessandro Preziosi, the period film was “outfitted” by costume designer Milena Canonero (a three-time Oscar winner), but beyond its gorgeous costumes and production design, it also focuses on the highly topical politics of Federico De Roberto’s 19th century novel.

The third Italian title of the week is 2D-animated film Bentornato Pinocchio by Orlando Corradi. Inspired by the characters of Carlo Collodi, it was produced by Mondo TV and is distributed by Moviemax on a 43-print run.

Two of the most highly awaited arthouse titles from Cannes and Venice also make it to Italy this week. Kenneth Branagh’s Venice title Sleuth [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]
, the remake of the Joseph L. Mankiewicz film, is being distributed by Sony on 63 screens. The new version (scripted by Nobel prize winner Harold Pinter) once again stars Michael Caine, who in the 1972 original, however, played the role this time filled by Jude Law (who also produced).

Picking up a Best Screenplay award on the Croisette, Fatih Akin's The Edge of Heaven [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Fatih Akin
interview: Klaus Maeck
film profile
]
is the latest offering by a director dedicated to the themes of identity and a dialogue between cultures. Which is why it is a shame that the complexity of a story set between Istanbul and Brema and shot in three languages (Turkish, German and English) is ruined by the dubbing. The version released by BIM, on 47 screens, does away with its multi-lingualism and, dubbed across the board into Italian, the film’s cosmopolitan spirit as well.

(The article continues below - Commercial information)

(Translated from Italian)

Did you enjoy reading this article? Please subscribe to our newsletter to receive more stories like this directly in your inbox.

Privacy Policy